San Antonio Missions National Historical Park

I feel like I’ve been going a lot lately and haven’t had any time to blog.  I’m still trying to catch up writing about my San Antonio visit last May/June.

While there I took the time to visit the San Antonio Missions National Historic Park.  The park encompasses 5 missions and an historic acequia (water canal).  Sadly, the park didn’t open until 9 am.  By this time, the best lighting had passed, and the weather was already hot as fire!  Despite the conditions, I had a good time exploring the missions.

I did manage to get a nice pic in the morning light just outside the monument walls.

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Mission San Jose

The first mission I visited was Mission San Jose y San Miguel de Aguayo.  This mission was constructed in 1768 and was designated a National Historic Site in 1966.  It had a large fenced in lawn with lots of buildings that used to house the friars that lived there.

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Mission San Jose

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Old well outside of the mission

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Mission portico

The front of the mission has been beautifully carved.  It’s amazing that these works of art are still in great condition after 250 years.

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Front doors of Mission San Jose

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Wonderful sculptures

The inside has been preserved beautifully.

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Sanctuary of Mission San Jose

The National Park is large.  It has about 15 miles of trails to hike and bike.  I wasn’t about to do either in the Texas summer heat and humidity.  So I drove to the next mission:  Mission San Juan Capistrano.  This mission was built in East Texas in 1716.  Then in 1731, the mission was moved to San Antonio.  It was designated at National Historic Landmark in 1972.

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Mission San Juan Capistrano

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Bell tower of Mission

Sadly I wasn’t allowed to go inside this mission.

Following that was Mission San Francisco de la Espada which was established in 1690 in central Texas.  It underwent several name changes until 1731 when it too was moved to San Antonio.  This mission was added to the National Historic Register in 1972.

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Mission San Francisco de la Espada

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Bell tower

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Mission Portico

I was able to step inside the sanctuary of this mission.  I didn’t realize there was a ceremony underway.  You can see the girl in the chair up front in her white dress.  She was celebrating her Quinceanera.  A celebration in the Latin communities for a girl’s 15th birthday.  I took a quick pic and left the patrons to their celebration.

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Quinceanera being celebrated

I then stopped at the Espada Aqueduct.  This aqueduct was built by Franciscan Friars in 1731 to supply irrigation water to lands near Mission San Francisco de la Espada.  The aqueduct is still in use today and is an Historic Civil Engineering Landmark and a National Historic Landmark.  It received these designations in 1964.

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Espada Aqueduct

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The double arches of the aqueduct.

I walked down to the stream.  Scarlett was so excited to see water.  Before I let her play and get a drink, I took pictures of the cool fish gathered in a pool.  There were lots of dragonflies about but very skittish.  I managed to get a pic of one little guy.

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Texas Ciclid – this fish was about 3 inches long.  You can see little babies it’s protecting

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Pretty damselfly

After the aqueduct, I drove to Mission Concepcion.  I loved the grounds surrounding this mission.  It had beautiful palm trees and expansive lawns.

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Beautiful old palm trees

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Mission Concepcion

This mission had a lot of rooms to explore along with a beautiful sanctuary.

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Alter at the Mission

I hope you enjoyed reading about my morning exploring the San Antonio Missions National Historic Park.  By now it was 11:30 am and it was over 100 degrees F, and I was so ready for a cold drink, a shower and air conditioning!

 

 

San Antonio Japanese Tea Garden

While in San Antonio last June, I visited the Japanese Tea Garden.  It’s not a very big place, but it’s very unique.  This site was initially a limestone quarry that opened in 1840.  Many of the buildings in San Antonio during that time were built with the stone from this quarry.

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Entrance to the gardens

In 1880 it was changed to a cement quarry.  At this time a kiln was added to the site, which still stands today.

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Old kiln door

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Kiln stack and buildings

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Such unique craftsmanship

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Living quarters for the laborers

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More openings for the kiln

By 1917 the cement plant had shut down.  The City Parks department of San Antonio launched a program to convert the old quarry into a Japanese Tea Garden.  Prison labor was used to shape the quarry into a complex that included walkways, stone arch bridges, an island and a Japanese pagoda.

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Restored pagoda, gardens and pond

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What a wonderful idea for an old quarry.

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Quiet beauty

In 1919, at the city’s invitation, Kimi Elzo Jingu, a local Japanese-American artist, moved to the garden.  Him and his wife maintained the garden, lived in the garden and raised 8 children.  Kimi died in 1938 and in 1941 the family was evicted from the garden due to the rise of anti-Japanese sentiment of World War II.

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Arched path built by prison labor

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Such beautiful landscaping

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Beautiful!

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Bridge to the kiln stack.

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The Japanese Tea House up above.

For years the garden sat in neglect and disrepair, becoming a target of graffiti and vandalism.  In 2005 the city started restoration on the pagoda-like pavilion.

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The roof was rebuilt in 2005. 

In 2007 restoration began to restore the ponds and waterfall.

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So beautiful!

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View from the pagoda

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Path to the waterfall.

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I loved the waterfall!

All work was completed by 2011.  The Jingu family members still alive returned for the public re-opening.  In recognition of the garden’s history, it has been designated as a Texas Civil Engineering Landmark, a registered Texas Historic Landmark, and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

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Wonderful paths

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Hidden paths

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So peaceful

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Walkway from the gardens to the zoo nearby

I am so glad this precious gem of history has been saved and has been restored to its previous glory.  It was a wonderful place to visit.  So peaceful and beautiful.

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I loved walking these paths

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If I lived here, I would visit often!

Scarlett enjoyed touring the walkways as well.  She was curious of the Koi fish and they looked like they were just as curious.

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Scarlett was fascinated by the curious koi 🙂

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I love the colorful koi fish

I’m so glad I decided to visit the gardens.  I would have been sad if I had never taken the time to see such beauty that has been restored to its former glory.

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This flower was as big as my head!