Birding at San Angelo State Park and Bitter Lake Wildlife Refuge

On my way home from Port Aransas, Texas, I took time to bird in San Angelo State Park in San Angelo, Texas, and at Bitter Lake National Wildlife Refuge at Roswell, New Mexico.

My drive to San Angelo was mostly rainy.  So I didn’t have any opportunities to bird that day.  I did stop in a little town to get a pic of an old building that looked interesting.

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I arrived in San Angelo with steady rain.  When I awoke the next morning, it was pretty foggy.  So birding conditions were not good at all.  But I still managed to get a quite a few sightings. I didn’t stay long as I wanted to have some time to bird at Bitter Lake.

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Bullock’s Oriole

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Curve-Billed Thrasher

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Bell’s Vireo

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Scissor-Tailed Flycatcher

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Pyrrhuloxia

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Lark Sparrow

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Cactus Wren

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Black Vultures

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Canyon Towhee

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Brown-Headed Cowbird

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Black-Crested Titmouse

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Bobwhite Quail

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Golden-Fronted Woodpecker

The best find of the morning was seeing a female Vermillion Flycatcher building her nest.  She would get some moss or grass and place it in the nest and then check it for comfort.  Then go get another piece to add.  I never did see the male.

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Vermillion Flycatcher – female

There wasn’t too much activity at Bitter Lake as I arrived there around midday.  After driving around for a little while and hiking a couple of short paths, I managed to find a few birds.

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Scissor-Tailed Flycatcher

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Yellow-Rumped Warbler – Myrtle Variety

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Lark Sparrow

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Green Heron

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Cinnamon Teal

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Scaled Quail

The highlight of the day though was seeing a variety of nightjars! These birds are so difficult to find in the wild.  But on this visit, they were all perched out in the open and very close to the road.  Awesome! I was able to get some good photographs!  Even with that advantage, it was still very difficult to identify the birds.  I mostly used size as a reference for the Common Poorwill as it is the smallest of the nightjars.  The Common Nighthawk flew and sang right after I took the up-close photo which made it easy to identify.

I think you’ll agree these are really cool birds!

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Common Poorwill

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Lesser Nighthawk

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Common Nighthawk

That concludes my 10-day trip to the gulf coast and all the wonderful bird sightings I was able to see during my travels.  I got 27 new lifers and my total number of lifer bird sightings is now at 396!!!

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Pronghorn Antelope

Egrets, Herons and other Waterfowl in Port Aransas, Texas

I saw lots and lots of egrets and herons on this trip.  Evidently southern Texas was experiencing a drought while I was there.  Due to the drought, the shallow salt water and fresh water ponds were small and sparse.  This was very hard on the birds, but made for great birding.  Every time I visited a pond, I would see lots of birds feeding there.  I hope they get rain soon because at the rate the fish were being eaten in the ponds, I can’t see how that resource can last much longer.

One of my favorite places to visit for the larger bird sightings was Charlie’s Pasture.  It’s a 5-mile or so trail that winds its way through the salt water flats.  Here’s a pic of one of the areas that should have had water but was dry.

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Miss Scarlett enjoying the boardwalk

When I did come upon a pool, this is what I would find.  Birds everywhere.  Needless to say, lots of squabbles broke out among the groups.

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I got to finally see a Reddish Egret.  Lifer!  Such a beautiful bird.  I especially love the long feathers on their neck that look like red hair.

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Reddish Egret

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I love the long feathers on their neck

Here are some other photos of egrets and herons I got on my trip.

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Great Blue Heron.  I loved the little red flowers he was standing in.

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Cattle Egret

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Snowy Egret

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Great Egret

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Green Heron

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Black-Crowned Night Heron

I saw my friendly Tri-Colored Heron at the Leonabelle Refuge.  He was quite the ham when I visited there last October.  He was even more so this trip.  I couldn’t resist photographing him as he just seemed to really enjoy the attention.  Plus he looked especially handsome in his breeding plumage.

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Tri-Colored Heron

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Tri-Colored Heron

One bird on my list to see was the Roseate Spoonbill.  I feared I wouldn’t see any as the days ticked by.  But the day before I left I got to see several.  They are beautiful birds!

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Roseate Spoonbill

I saw my first Mottled Ducks on this trip.  Lifer!  Several had babies.  So adorable.

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Mottled Duck

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Mottled duck babies

Speaking of babies, I saw my first American Coot baby.  They start out with white on them and eventually turn black.

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American Coot juvenile

And the most adorable (though not very cute) babies I saw were the Common Gallinule.  I was told they were only a few days old when I first saw them.  They were a treat to watch.  Their wings didn’t have feathers but instead had what looked like hands.  They would hold them up and wave them to beg for food.  It was hysterical!

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Common Gallinule babies

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Common Gallinule baby begging for food

Another favorite of the trip was watching the Least Bittern.  I saw a pair of them several times.  They were working on building a nest, but their location just couldn’t be photographed as it was too deep in the reeds.

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Least Bittern

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Least Bittern

While visiting the Aransas Wildlife Refuge, I spotted another lifer for the trip.  A Least Grebe.  It was very small and dark so was hard to spot.  But once I zoomed in with my camera, I was struck by the beauty of its eye.

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Least Grebe

Here are some other birds that fit this post’s category.  Everywhere I looked on this trip, were birds, birds and more birds!  Paradise!

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Ruddy Duck

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Double-Crested Cormorant juvenile

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Pied-Billed Grebe

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Black-Bellied Whistling Duck

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White Ibis

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Blue-Winged Teal

 

This was a big category (including 3 lifers!).  I hope you enjoyed the photos.  I had a fabulous time taking them!  🙂

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