Capulin Spring Birding

Yesterday I got up early so I could visit Capulin Spring in the Sandia Mountains.  This is a great time to visit the spring because we get some fall migrating warblers.  The most sought after warbler this time of year is the Townsend’s Warbler.  We only get them here for a few weeks in September, then we have to wait another year to see them again.

So I had high hopes of seeing this warbler.  I had my new camera after all!  I was hoping to get a better photo of one than I have in the past.

When I first arrived there were the usual Dark-Eyed Juncos about.  They are always here in great numbers.  We get several variety of Juncos in New Mexico, but the most common is the “gray headed”.

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Dark-Eyed Junco – Gray Headed

Then a group of Yellow-Rumped Warblers came in for a drink and a bath.  We have these birds here year round.  Now that it’s officially fall, their plumage is less vibrant than in the spring.  But they are still a pretty warbler.

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Yellow-Rumped Warbler

After sitting quietly for awhile I was rewarded with the Townsend’s Warbler.  Two of them in fact! Beautiful!  They were very cautious to come get a drink.   As with all warblers, they were quick too!  But I managed to get a few good pics.  Here are a couple of my favorites.

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Townsend’s Warbler

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Townsend’s Warbler

Then a couple of fellow birders showed up – Sharon and Vicki.  We had a great time birding together.  With three pairs of eyes, we were able see more sightings.  One of which was a new bird for me!

Sharon pointed out a soaring bird way up high overhead.  I zoomed way in and was able to get one photo before it soared away.  Not a great photo but I got it! A Northern Goshawk!

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Northern Goshawk

For awhile we had been seeing Steller’s Jays.  They were acting very shy.  But once us girls started visiting, they seem to relax and start coming in.  Funny!  You’d think sitting still and quiet would make them more brave.  Instead, they were happier when they were ignored.  LOL!

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Steller’s Jay

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Steller’s Jay

There were several Ruby Crowned Kinglets about but they were quick!  I got a lot of bad photos and one decent one.

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Ruby Crowned Kinglet

Vicki pointed out a different Junco – a “pink sided”.  A pretty little bird.

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Dark-Eyed Junco – Pink Sided

Happily another warbler showed up for a drink and bath – an Orange-Crowned Warbler.

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Orange-Crowned Warbler

A couple nuthatches showed up.  I usually see more when I visit, but this day they were kinda scarce.

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Red-Breasted Nuthatch

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White-Breasted Nuthatch

Here are picks of the other more common visitors to the spring.

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Chipping Sparrow

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Northern Flicker

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Mountain Chickadee

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Lesser Goldfinch

Then to my great delight a Plumbeous Vireo showed up.  He was very nervous and darted all about.  Though not a great pic – it was the best of the bunch.  Soon he will be leaving us for the winter.

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Plumbeous Vireo

Just before I was leaving I saw a Green-Tailed Towhee – always a delight to see and hear.

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Green-Tailed Towhee

It was a great morning birding with friends.  🙂

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

12 thoughts on “Capulin Spring Birding

  1. What can I say Kelly, every shot is stunningly beautiful, amazing captures. You always have such a variety and that Stella’s Jay is so vivid blue! Well done! I think you have the most variety per post of your American birds.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you so much Ashley! Very kind. The Steller’s Jay is one of my favorite birds because they are so colorful and unique looking. I try my best to see a lot of birds on my outings and to get as good a photo as I can get of them. It’s a personal challenge 😊

      Liked by 1 person

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